A Day in the Life of a Tremco Technical Specialist

It takes many different roles to implement a company’s international initiatives. Dante Marimpietri, one of Tremco’s Technical Specialists, plays a critical role in this process. He works directly with customers across the globe to help train them on product application and problem-solve any issues on the jobsite. We sat down with Dante to get a better understanding of his job and how he contributed to our product training in Bogota, Colombia in January 2017.

Q. What is your background?

A. Previously, I was an R&D chemist and I realized that it didn’t fit my personality so well. So I wanted to get into a more extroverted, customer-facing role. That’s why my role at Tremco was the next step.

Q. What does a typical day look like for you? What do you enjoy most about your job?

A. No day is ever typical. It’s always something different. Which is kind of a blessing and a curse, right?…I like being on a project working with somebody and coming to a successful resolution for their problem and project…when it’s all done, it’s totally worth it.

I touch every piece of the company, if that makes sense. Because I’m dealing with product management, I’m dealing with [marketing] in this situation, and then I deal with R&D all the time and we talk about issues in the field, we’re dealing with manufacturing if there’s something wrong… That’s the cool part about my role.

Q. What’s one of the hardest parts of your job?

A. Customer expectations…Making sure that the customers are happy is my highest priority. Sometimes juggling a bunch of different things can make it challenging.

Q. What are the important skills necessary for your job?

A. To be outgoing. To be not afraid of confrontation. And confident…a little bit of resourcefulness too. Learning how to adapt and be successful in a situation that does not have conventional means.

Q. What is the process to solving an issue that comes up?

A. Whenever there’s an issue…just to listen. To gather the facts, to figure out what they were doing without trying to impart anything…It’s taking a step back and looking at it objectively.

Q. What were the preparations for the international training in Colombia?

A. It was a little more extensive [In Colombia]…I don’t speak Spanish; I have no idea where to source materials locally, and the tools they use are still slightly different than what we use here… We started the planning for Colombia months ahead of time. We needed to make sure we had the right products… the right application tools and to make sure the presentations were tailored to their market, no sense in discussing products that are not locally available… I think just as far as technical services goes, you’re not going to have everything you need on-site so sometimes you need to find non-conventional methods of providing a great outcome.

Q. In a training, do you prefer hands-on teaching or a presentation?

A. It all depends upon the crowd that’s there. We were fortunate enough to have contractors there, and then we could go over the minute differences of some of our products and others… It’s just much easier to demonstrate and give somebody the tools…I like talking and having an interactive conversation with these people, but I think you get more out of the actual hands-on.

Q. How do these trainings contribute to the success of the company? What was your favorite part of the Colombia training?

A. The more you get out there and make these kinds of visits and demonstrate your presence in a market, the greater potential you have for growth in that market. I think that if we want to be successful internationally, we have to keep creating buzz and having these types of events.

I really enjoyed making these international connections. I still talk to a lot of the guys down there. They come to me for advice and ask me how I would do things…I put this stuff down a lot, but I don’t put it down every day all day like these guys… I’ve taken things that I’ve learned over my career from guys in the field and incorporated them into what I said in Colombia. How I taught people. If you stop learning, what good are you bringing to the table?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *